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  • 635 635Full Access Underbody Blanket

    Positioned on the operating table before surgery the Full Access Underbody warming blanket provides unrestricted access to the patient for clinical flexibility.

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  • 81002 810023M Bair Paws Patient Warming Gown

    The 3M™ Bair Paws™ Warming Gown offers the comfort of clinical warming versatility through conveniently located Bair Paws and 3M™ Bair Hugger™ hose ports.

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  • Reliable Partner Reliable Partner3M™ Bair Hugger™ Therapy

    Expertise combined with prompt and efficient service to help you achieve your goals

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  • Delivering Education Everyday Delivering Education Everyday3M™ Bair Hugger™ Therapy

    Our team of patient warming experts are dedicated to meeting your education and training needs.

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3M™ Patient Warming Solutions

Anaesthetised patients can’t regulate their temperature. The body’s physiological response to anaesthesia places virtually every anaesthetised surgical patient at risk for unintended hypothermia, regardless of age, sex or physical condition.

Unintended perioperative hypothermia has been called a frequent, but preventable complication of surgery; with adverse effects on the patient, who is already compromised by surgical intervention.

Unless preventative measures are taken, inadvertent perioperative hyporthermia will occur in 50% to 90% of surgical patients. Maintaining normothermia during the surgical procedure is therefore a
critical aspect of patient care.

3M has a range of patient warming solutions to help prevent and treat inadvertent perioperative hypothermia including:

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References

    The body's physiological response to anaesthesia places virtually every anaesthetised surgical patient at risk of unintended hypothermia, regardless of age, sex of physical condition. Research shows that core body temperature drops rapidly (up to 1.6°C in the first hour alone) following the induction of anaesthesia. Unfortunately, unintended hypothermia remains an all too common and costly complication of surgery despite its association with higher mortality rates, longer hospital stays and an increased rate of wound infection.

    Sessler, D. I., (1997) Current Concepts: mild perioperative hypothermia, New England Journal of Medicine, Vol 336, No 24, pp 1730-1737
    Barie P.S. (2002) Surgical site infections: epidemiology and prevention. Surgical Infections No. 3 Suppl 1, pp. S9-S21
    Jeran L. (2001) American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses Development Panel. Clinical Guideline for the Prevention of Unplanned Perioperative Hypothermia. Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing Oct 2001 No. 16, Vol. 5, pp. 305-314
    Tryba M., Leban J., et al. (1996) Does active warming of severely injured trauma patients influence perioperative morbidity? No. 85, pp.A283

    Unintended perioperative hypothermia has been called a frequent, but preventable complication of surgery; with adverse effects on the patient, who is already compromised by surgical intervention.
    Unless preventative measures are taken, inadvertent perioperative hyporthermia will occur in 50% to 90% of surgical patients. Maintaining normothermia during the surgical procedure is therefore a
    critical aspect of patient care.

    Sessler, D. I., (1997) Current Concepts: mild perioperative hypothermia, New England Journal of Medicine, Vol 336, No 24, pp 1730-1737
    Young, V. L, Watson, M.E, (2006) Prevention of perioperative hypothermia in plastic surgery. Aesthetic Surgery Journal, Vol. 26, No 5, pp 551-571.