Skip to Primary Navigation Skip to Site Navigation Skip to Main Content All 3M.com Site Map
Keeping Patients Warm

Over 70% of surgical patients experience postoperative hypothermia every year.

Unintended hypothermia is easily preventable. Studies show that warming patients to maintain a core temperature of 36.0ºC or higher helps improve outcomes by reducing the frequency of complications often associated with inadvertent hypothermia. The consequences of hypothermia include higher mortality rates, longer hospital stays and an increased rate of wound infection.

Learn more about hypothermia and the body's thermoregulatory system by visiting our e-Learning site.

Patient Comfort and Clinical Performance

3M™ Bair Hugger™ Patient Warming Therapy is designed for easy and effective treatment and prevention of hypothermia whilst delivering enhanced patient comfort.

The Bair Hugger patient warming system consists of a small, lightweight and easy to use temperature management unit which is attached to a warming blanket providing consistent, controllable warmth to the patient.

Take a look at our wide range of warming blankets

View Our Product Catalogue
Education Everyday
Learn More

References

    Over 70% of surgical patients experience post-operative hypothermia every year.

    Augustine SD. Hypothermia therapy in the postanesthesia care unit: a review. (J Post Anesth Nurs 1990;No, 5, Vo,l 4: 254-263)

    Unintended hypothermia is easily preventable. Studies show that warming patients to maintain a core temperature of 36.0ºC or higher helps improve outcomes by reducing the frequency of complications often associated with inadvertent hypothermia. The effects of hypothermia include higher mortality rates, longer hospital stays and an increased rate of wound infection.

    1. Frank S.M., Fleisher L.A., Breslow M.J, et al (1997), Perioperative maintenance of normothermia reduces the incidence of morbid cardiac events. A randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA, No. 277, Vol. 14, pp. 1127-1134
    2. Bush H.L. Jr., Hydo L.J., Fischer E., Fantini G.A., Silane M.F., Barie P.S. (1995) Hypothermia during elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: the high price of avoidable morbidity. Journal of Vascular Surgery No. 21, Vol. 3, pp. 392-402
    3. Schmeid H., Kurz A., et al. (1995) Mild hypothermia increases blood loss and transfusion requirements during total hip arthroplasty. The Lancet, No. 347 , Vol.8997, pp. 289-292
    4. Brown Mahoney, C. (year) Maintaining intra-operative normothermia reduces risk of adverse outcome for more cost effective patient care. (AANA Journal forthcoming)
    5. Sessler D.I. (1997) Current concepts: mild perioperative hypothermia. New England Journal of Medicine, No. 336, Vol. 24, pp. 1730-1737