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The Facts about Forced-Air Warming

The Facts about Forced-Air Warming

Forced-air warming, an effective way to prevent and treat perioperative hypothermia.

Forced-air warming is a convective form of patient warming, which works by delivering warm air directly to the patient's skin. Water mattresses, electric blankets and heated pads are conductive methods of warming which work through surface to skin contact.

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Conductive warming methods such as water mattresses and electric pads only transfer heat where they make direct contact with patient’s skin. This means that less of the patient's body areas is warmed. Because forced-air warming involves circulation of warm air around the patient it warms more body surface area whilst still providing sufficient surgical access.

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References

    Forced-air warming, an effective way to prevent and treat Hypothermia

    1. Sessler DI. (1997), Current concepts: mild perioperative hypothermia. New England Journal of Medicine, No. 24, Vol, 336, pp. 1730-1737.
    2. Plattner, O. et. al (2010), Comparison of Forced-Air and a New Resistive Warming Device for Intraoperative Rewarming. ASA abstracts, 2010. A076.
    3. Tominaga A., Koitabashi T., et al. (2007) Efficacy of an underbody Forced-Air Warming Blanket for the Prevention of Intraoperative Hypothermia. Anesthesiology. 107: A91
    4. Ouchi, T. et. al. Lithotomy Underbody Air Blanket Can Prevent Intraoperative Redistribution Hypothermia . ASA abstracts, 2010. A088.
    5. Engelen, S, et al. (2010) A Comparison of Under-Body Forced Air and Resistive Heating during Hypothermic,on-pump cardiac surgery. Anaesthesia, Vol 66, No.2 , pp.104-110.

    Conductive warming methods such as water mattresses and electric pads only transfer heat where they make direct contact with patient’s skin. This means that less of the patient's body area is warmed.

    1. Hohn, L., et al. Benefits of intraoperative skin surface warming in cardiac surgical patients. British Journal of Anesthesia. 1998; 80: 318-323.
    2. Taguchi, A., et al. Effects of a circulating water garment and forced-air warming on body heat content and core temperature. Anesthesiology. May 2004, Vol 100, No. 5: 1058-64.
    3. Hohn, L., et al (1998), Benefits of intraoperative skin surface warming in cardiac surgical patients. British Journal of Anesthesia, No. 80, pp. 318-323.
      Taguchi, A., et al. (2004), Effects of a circulating water garment and forced-air warming on body heat content and core temperature. Anesthesiology, Vol. 100, No. 5, pp.1058-64.